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Three at Carolina Recognized for Efforts to Advance Science

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The American Association for the Advancement of Science has awarded the distinction of fellow to three UNC faculty members.

Fellows are recognized for their efforts to advance science or its applications. New fellows will be honored on Feb. 17 at the group’s annual meeting in San Francisco.

The following faculty are new AAAS fellows:

  • Joseph M. DeSimone , director of the UNC Institute for Advanced Materials, Nanoscience and Technology and Kenan Distinguished Professor of chemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences. Simone is an expert on environmentally friendly manufacturing, especially of polymers. His research examines all aspects of polymer synthesis and processing, from fundamental aspects of chemical systems to the most efficient and environmentally friendly ways to manufacture polymers and polymer products. Simone co-founded Micell Technologies Inc., which pioneered carbon dioxide dry cleaning technology to replace the solvent perchloroethylene. DeSimone was named fellow of the AAAS Section on Chemistry for “distinguished contributions to polymer synthesis and processing, from fundamental aspects of chemical systems to environmentally friendly ways to manufacture polymers.”
  • Daniel A. Reed , director of the Renaissance Computing Institute, UNC vice chancellor for information technology and Chancellor’s Eminent Professor. Reed is founding director of interdisciplinary Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI), a collaborative venture of UNC, Duke and N.C. State universities and the state of North Carolina. RENCI brings together computer and discipline scientists, artists, humanists, industry leaders, entrepreneurs, state leaders and educators for collaborations designed to reshape science, the economy, the state of North Carolina and the world. Reed served as director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the birthplace of the modern Web browser. He is a member of President Bush’s Information Technology Advisory Committee, charged with providing advice on information technology issues and challenges to the president. He was named fellow of the AAAS Section on Information, Computing, and Communication for “outstanding research in the field of high performance computing, exemplary professional leadership, and distinguished national service.”
  • Stephen J. Walsh , director of the Landscape Characterization and Spatial Analysis Lab and professor of geography in the College of Arts and Sciences. Walsh examines the interactions between people, places and the environment using geographic information systems, remote sensing, spatial analysis and physical geography. Walsh directs studies in Ecuador, Thailand, Latvia and the U.S. He was named fellow of the AAAS Section on Geology and Geography for “substantive landscape characterization and spatial analysis through remote sensing and geographic information science.”

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